Beginning with Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA) and American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM).

In 1972, Congress enacted the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA) and established the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) under the Act to “protect the public against unreasonable risks of injuries and deaths associated with consumer products.”1

The CPSC uses standards defined by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM).2 The extensive range of products regulated by CPSC and the standards developed by ASTM covers industries well beyond clothing, toys, and household appliances.

The goal of the upcoming articles we provide isn’t meant to define or replace information from these organizations, nor will we be covering all the information provided by them. The upcoming articles are simply meant to consolidate basic information to inform the public and to provide some references to help people learn more about selecting children’s toys and products, especially those use with Special Needs Children.

 

Information provided is based on information provided as of September 13, 2016 from 16 CFR §1112.15(b)(32), found on CPSC website, www.cpsc.gov and ASTM F 963 standards found on ASTM website, www.astm.org.

ASTM F 963-07?1
Section 4.27 – Toy Chests (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)

ASTM F 963-11
Section 4.3.5.1, Surface Coating Materials – Soluble Test for Metals
Section 4.3.5.2, Toy Substrate Materials
Section 4.3.6.3, Cleanliness of Liquids, Pastes, Putties, Gels, and Powders (except for cosmetics and tests on formulations used to prevent microbial degradation)
Section 4.3.7, Stuffing Materials
Section 4.5, Sound Producing Toys
Section 4.6, Small Objects (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.7, Accessible Edges (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.8, Projections
Section 4.9, Accessible Points (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.10, Wires or Rods
Section 4.11, Nails and Fasteners
Section 4.12, Plastic Film
Section 4.13, Folding Mechanisms and Hinges
Section 4.14, Cords, Straps, and Elastics
Section 4.15, Stability and Overload Requirements
Section 4.16, Confined Spaces
Section 4.17, Wheels, Tires, and Axles
Section 4.18, Holes, Clearances, and Accessibility of Mechanisms
Section 4.19, Simulated Protective Devices (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.20.1, Pacifiers with Rubber Nipples/Nitrosamine Test
Section 4.20.2, Toy Pacifiers
Section 4.21, Projectile Toys
Section 4.22, Teethers and Teething Toys
Section 4.23.1, Rattles with Nearly Spherical, Hemispherical, or Circular Flared Ends
Section 4.24, Squeeze Toys
Section 4.25, Battery-Operated Toys (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.26, Toys Intended to Be Attached to a Crib or Playpen (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.27, Stuffed and Beanbag-Type Toys
Section 4.30, Toy Gun Marking
Section 4.32, Certain Toys with Spherical Ends
Section 4.35, Pompoms
Section 4.36, Hemispheric-Shaped Objects
Section 4.37, Yo-Yo Elastic Tether Toys
Section 4.38, Magnets (except labeling and/or instructional literature requirements)
Section 4.39, Jaw Entrapment in Handles and Steering Wheels

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1 http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Safety-Education/Safety-Guides/General-Information/Who-We-Are—What-We-Do-for-You/

2 https://www.astm.org/

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